Séminaire d'Automatique du plateau de Saclay

Séminaire le 4 Décembre 2019, 10h00 à CentraleSupelec (Gif-sur-Yvette) Salle du conseil du L2S - B4.40
Paolo Mason & Hendra Nurdin

10:00-11:00 Paolo Mason (Chargé de recherche, CNRS, L2S, CentraleSupélec)

Title: Controllability of the Schrodinger equation via adiabatic methods

Abstract: In this presentation I will consider the approximate controllability problem for the bilinear Schrodinger equation. In particular I will focus on the application of adiabatic techniques in presence of conical eigenvalues intersections of the Hamiltonian operator. These methods allow to design, in a constructive way, control laws capable of (approximately) steering the system from an eigenstate of the Hamiltonian to an arbitrary target state (or, more precisely, to an arbitrary density distribution). The relationship between our results and other controllability results for the bilinear Schrodinger equation will be discussed, as well as the connection between adiabatic and singular perturbation techniques. Finally, in order to justify the applicability of the presented results, I will provide physically meaningful classes of Hamiltonian operators
for which eigenvalues intersections are generically conical.

Biography: Paolo Mason was born in Dolo, Italy, in 1978. He received the Laurea degree in mathematics from the University of Padova, Italy, in 2002, and the Ph.D. degree from SISSA, Trieste, Italy, in 2006. Since 2009 he works as a “chargé de recherche” (researcher) for CNRS at the Laboratoire des Signaux et Systèmes, Gif-sur- Yvette, France. His research interests include geometric control theory, quantum control and hybrid systems. 

11:00-12:00 Hendra Nurdin (Senior Lecturer, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, UNSW, Australia)

Title: Learning nonlinear input-output maps with dissipative quantum systems

Abstract: In this seminar, I will describe a theoretical framework for learning of nonlinear input-output maps with fading memory by dissipative quantum systems, as a quantum counterpart of the theory of approximating such maps using classical dynamical systems. Such a theory can provide the foundation for harnessing of dissipative quantum systems for applications such as nonlinear systems modelling and signal processing. In particular, the theory identifies the properties required for a class of dissipative quantum systems to be universal, in the sense that any input-output map with fading memory can be approximated arbitrarily closely by an element of this class. We then introduce an example class of dissipative quantum systems that is provably universal. Some numerical examples will be presented.

The seminar is based on joint work with J. Chen (Quantum Information Processing, 18(7):198 (2019)) 

Biography: Dr Hendra I. Nurdin received the bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia, the master's degree in engineering mathematics from the University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands, and the Ph.D. degree in engineering and information science from the Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, ACT, Australia, in 2007. From 2007 to 2011, he was a Research Fellow and then an Australian Research Council APD Fellow with the ANU before joining the University of New South Wales, Australia, in 2012. His research interests include quantum systems, quantum feedback control, stochastic systems and stochastic control, and applications of control theory to microgrids and renewable energy systems. He  is a coauthor, with Naoki Yamamoto, of the Springer research monograph “Linear dynamical quantum systems: Analysis, synthesis, and control” (2017).