Improved Millimeter-Wave Radar Concealed-Threat Person Scanning

Seminar on April 08, 2016, 2:00 PM at CentraleSupelec (Gif-sur-Yvette) Salle du conseil du L2S - B4.40
Carey M. Rappapor

Metal-detecting airport security scanners for airline passengers are being replaced by millimeter-wave imagers. These new systems are much better at revealing concealed manmade objects, but they can be improved. At our Advanced Imaging Technology Lab at Northeastern University in Boston, we are developing a custom-designed elliptical toroid reflector antenna which allows multiple overlapping beams for focused wide-angle illumination to speed data acquisition and accurately image strongly inclined body surfaces.  We have developed the concept of the Blade Beam Reflector both as a single transmitting antenna and a multi-beam Toroidal Reflector, with multiple feeds. Each feed generates a different incident beam with different viewing angles, while still maintaining the blade beam configuration of narrow slit illumination in the vertical direction.  Having multiple transmitters provides horizontal resolution and imaging of full 120 deg. of body.  Furthermore, the reflector can simultaneously be used for receiving the scattered field, with high gain, overlapping, high vertical resolution beams for each transmitting or receiving array element. The multistatic transmitting and receiving array configuration sensing avoids dihedral artifacts from body crevices and reduces non-specular drop-outs, and will leads to a faster, higher resolution, and less expensive security system.

Bio — Carey M. Rappaport received five degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology:  the SB in Mathematics, the SB, SM, and EE in Electrical Engineering in June 1982, and the PhD in Electrical Engineering in June 1987.  He is married to Ann W. Morgenthaler, and has two children, Sarah and Brian. Prof. Rappaport joined the faculty at Northeastern University in Boston, MA in 1987.  He has been Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering since July 2000. In 2011, he was appointed College of Engineering Distinguished Professor.  He was Principal Investigator of an ARO-sponsored Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative on Humanitarian Demining, Co-Principal Investigator of the NSF-sponsored Engineering Research Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems (CenSSIS), and Co-Principal Investigator and Deputy Director of the DHS-sponsored Awareness and Localization of Explosive Related Threats (ALERT) Center of Excellence. Prof. Rappaport has authored over 400 technical journal and conference papers in the areas of microwave antenna design, electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering computation, and bioelectromagnetics, and has received two reflector antenna patents, two biomedical device patents and three subsurface sensing device patents.  He was awarded the IEEE Antenna and Propagation Society's H.A. Wheeler Award for best applications paper, as a student in 1986.  He is a member of Sigma Xi and Eta Kappa Nu professional honorary societies.